contraception,mst,prévention

Herpes

Pages liées  Santé Contraception Bénins Sexualité

Forum gratuit
Sexologie/Sexualité

Forum gratuit Santé

En savoir plus: Chat en ligne
AVSC International
[ Home | About AVSC | Site index | Publications ] [ Version Française | Versión Español ]
[ || Pregnancy || Informed Choice || Infections and Diseases || Quality of Care || Emerging Issues ]

Herpes

What is herpes?
How does someone get herpes?
What are the risk factors for herpes?
How can you protect yourself from getting herpes?
What are some symptoms of herpes?
What triggers a herpes outbreak?
Can infection with herpes lead to other health problems?
What is the impact of herpes on pregnancy?
How is herpes diagnosed?
Is there a treatment or cure for herpes?

What is herpes?

Herpes is a common infection caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV), of which there are two subtypes: HSV-1 and HSV-2. Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 can cause blisters and ulcers on the mouth, face, genitals, or around the anus. Once a person is infected with herpes, he or she remains infected for life. However, the virus often remains "latent" and does not cause symptoms for long periods of time.

How does someone get herpes?

Herpes spreads through intimate skin contact with an infected individual. Although the virus can be spread through contact with lesions or secretions, most transmission occurs from unrecognized lesions or asymptomatic shedding. Transmission of the virus can occur when the infected partner does not have an active outbreak of blisters, ulcers, or other symptoms. Some individuals may never have any symptoms and not know that they are infected with the herpes virus. However, they can still transmit the virus to others. Oral herpes can be spread through kissing. Genital herpes is transmitted through sexual contact (vaginal, anal, and oral). The virus can be transmitted from oral to genital regions and vice versa during oral sex.

What are the risk factors for herpes?

The primary risk factors for herpes include:

  • Engaging in unsafe sex
  • Having sex with more than one partner
  • Being in a sexual relationship with someone who has multiple sex partners

How can you protect yourself from getting herpes?

The chance of becoming infected with herpes can be reduced by avoiding risky sexual behaviors.

To reduce your risk:

  • Using latex or polyurethane condoms during sex may help reduce the risk of transmission, but transmission may still occur if herpes lesions are on parts of the body not covered by the condom
  • Limit your number of sex partners

What are some symptoms of herpes?

Many individuals infected with herpes never have any symptoms and do not know they are infected. The initial herpes infection may be accompanied by flu-like symptoms, such as fever, fatigue, headaches, muscle aches, and swollen glands (lymph nodes) in addition to blisters and ulcers on and around the genitals, thighs, buttocks, and anus or on the lips, mouth, throat, tongue, and gums. Lesions may also be found within the vagina and on the cervix. In the case of genital infection there may also be pain and itching where the sore is located or burning with urination. These blisters eventually crust over, form a scab, and eventually heal, usually within 1-3 weeks.

Once the initial infection has resolved, some people experience outbreaks of genital blisters, ulcers, or small sores, which can occur on the penis, vulva, anus, buttocks, and/or thighs. Itching and tingling in the genitals are often an early warning sign that an outbreak is soon to occur. The frequency and severity of outbreaks varies from one person to the next. Sores that occur during outbreaks generally last 3-7 days and are not as painful as those of the initial infection, and systemic symptoms are rare. However, some people may experience recurrent, painful genital ulcers. In addition, people with suppressed immune systems may experience severe, persistent ulcers.

What triggers a herpes outbreak?

Outbreaks of herpes can be triggered by a number of factors, including:

  • Stress
  • Sunlight
  • Sickness or fever
  • Certain types of foods or beverages (including peanuts, alcohol, and coffee)

Can infection with herpes lead to other health problems?

Although genital herpes usually causes mild symptoms, some people may experience recurrent painful genital ulcers, which can be especially severe in people with suppressed immune systems. Like other STIs, herpes may also increase the risk for transmitting or acquiring HIV infection.

What is the impact of herpes on pregnancy?

Herpes can be passed from mother to baby. The chance of giving herpes to the baby is highest if the initial infection occurs near the time of delivery. The virus can be transmitted to the baby in utero or during passage through an infected birth canal. First-time infection during pregnancy leads to an increased risk of miscarriage, decreased fetal growth, and preterm labor. About 50% of infants who are born vaginally to a mother with first-time infection become infected with the herpes virus. In other women with herpes, only 4% of babies will become infected with the virus.

If a woman is having an active outbreak of genital herpes at the time of delivery, the baby will usually be delivered by C-section to prevent transmission of herpes.

Of the infants infected with herpes at birth, 30-60% die within the first month. Survivors may have long-term complications such as mental retardation and seizures. To prevent transmission to their babies, pregnant women should discuss any past history of herpes with their health care providers and take adequate measures to prevent infection during pregnancy.

How is herpes diagnosed?

Herpes can be diagnosed by testing a sample taken from an ulcer or blister. There is no readily available reliable blood test for the virus, and there is no certain diagnosis for individuals who are asymptomatic.

Is there a treatment or cure for herpes?

There is no cure for genital herpes. Once an individual is infected with herpes, they carry the virus in their body for life. There are antiviral drugs and creams (such as Acyclovir), which may be used to decrease the severity of the symptoms, the duration of an outbreak, and the frequency of recurring outbreaks. Infected individuals can also avoid some of the known causes of outbreaks to prevent recurring outbreaks. During an outbreak, symptomatic relief may be obtained by keeping the area clean and dry, taking pain relievers (such as aspirin, acetominophin, or ibuprofen), and for genital herpes by taking sitz baths (sitting in the tub with warm water covering the hips).



[ || Pregnancy || Informed Choice || Infections and Diseases || Quality of Care || Emerging Issues ]
[ Home | About AVSC | Site index | Publications ] [ Version Française | Versión Español ]
©2000 AVSC International. Please complete our survey or send questions/comments to: info@avsc.org.

Accueil | Conditions générales | FAQ | Contact | Créé par CAPIT
 Accueil
 Mon Menu Perso
 Rencontre
 Messagerie
 Chat
 Espace membre
 Expressions
 Forum
 Santé
 Mutuelles
 Contraception
 Bénins
 Grossesse
 IVG
 Stérilité
 MST
 Sida
 IAG
 Adresses
 Liens
 Sélection livres
 Forum santé
 Sexualité
 Mariage
 Astrologie
 Jeux
 Voyager
 Humour
 Editorial
2 connectés au chat
12 connectés au total
Consulter l'annonce
ajouter aux favoris Herpes