contraception,mst,prévention

Human Papillomavirus (genital warts)

Pages liées  Santé Contraception Bénins Sexualité

Forum gratuit
Sexologie/Sexualité

Forum gratuit Santé

En savoir plus: Chat en ligne
AVSC International
[ Home | About AVSC | Site index | Publications ] [ Version Française | Versión Español ]
[ || Pregnancy || Informed Choice || Infections and Diseases || Quality of Care || Emerging Issues ]

Human Papillomavirus (Genital Warts)

What is human papillomavirus?
How does someone get human papillomavirus?
What are the risk factors for human papillomavirus?
How can you protect yourself from getting human papillomavirus?
What are some symptoms of human papillomavirus?
Can infection with human papillomavirus lead to other health problems?
What is a Pap smear?
What is the impact of human papillomavirus on pregnancy?
How is human papillomavirus diagnosed?
Is there a treatment or cure for human papillomavirus?

What is human papillomavirus?

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a group of more than 70 types of viruses that can cause warts or papillomas. Although some types of HPV cause common warts on hands and feet, genital HPVs are sexually transmitted and can cause warts in the genital and anal area of both men and women. Some strains of HPV are associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer.

How does someone get human papillomavirus?

The virus is passed by direct contact during sex with a wart or skin that is infected with the virus. It is possible to get the warts on hands and in the mouth through contact during foreplay or oral sex. About 50% of individuals who are infected with HPV never develop genital warts, but are still capable of transmitting the virus to others.

What are the risk factors for human papillomavirus?

The primary risk factors for HPV include:

  • Engaging in unsafe sex
  • Having sex with more than one partner
  • Beginning sexual activity as a teenager
  • Being in a sexual relationship with someone who has multiple sex partners

How can you protect yourself from getting human papillomavirus?

The chance of becoming infected with human papillomavirus can be reduced by avoiding risky sexual behaviors.

To reduce your risk:

  • Using latex or polyurethane condoms during sex may help reduce the risk of transmission, but transmission may still occur if warts are on parts of the body not covered by the condom
  • Limit your number of sex partners

What are some symptoms of human papillomavirus?

HPV may cause warts with many different characteristics. They may appear small or large, flat or raised, single or multiple; sometimes the warts may not even be visible. The most common places to notice warts are outside the vagina, on the penis, and around the anus. In women, HPV can lead to the development of warts inside the vagina and on the cervix as well. In about half of all cases, persons infected with HPV do not have any warts.

Can infection with human papillomavirus lead to other health problems?

Some sexually transmitted HPVs are linked with genital and anal cancers in both women and men. Of greatest significance, some types of HPV can cause changes in the cells of the cervix, which can eventually lead to cervical cancer. HPV is the most important risk factor for cervical cancer in women; almost all cases of cervical cancer are caused by HPV. The types of HPV that cause visible genital warts are usually not the same as those leading to precancerous cell changes of the cervix. Regular Pap smears can lead to early detection and treatment of precancerous cell changes, which can prevent cervical cancer.

What is a Pap smear?

Pap smears are used for screening women for changes of the cervix that could lead to cervical cancer. They are often taken during routine annual gynecological exams. Cells collected from the cervix are put onto slides and looked at under the microscope for abnormalities. The results of Pap smears may indicate that precancerous cells are present. Abnormal results of a Pap smear do not always indicate precancerous changes. Individuals who receive abnormal results may need a repeat Pap smear or may need additional tests. If Pap smears do lead to detection of precancerous cells at an early stage, they can be treated with great success. Precancerous cell changes usually cause no symptoms. That is why it is important to have routine Pap smears.

What is the impact of human papillomavirus on pregnancy?

During pregnancy, because of hormonal changes, genital warts may grow large enough to obstruct the birth canal. In such cases, the warts may need to be surgically removed or a C-section may be needed for delivery. In rare cases, HPV can also infect the newborn infant and can cause warts in the baby's throat.

How is human papillomavirus diagnosed?

For many people who have HPV infection, there are no obvious signs of infection. However, if warts are present, a doctor can diagnose HPV infection by their characteristic appearance and the history of how they developed. In women, to look for warts on the cervix or in the vagina, a doctor may use a colposcope, which is like a telescope. In addition, Pap smear results may be suggestive of HPV infection. There is currently no blood test that has proven reliable in the diagnosis of HPV infection.

Is there a treatment or cure for human papillomavirus?

There is currently no cure for human papillomavirus. Once an individual is infected, he or she carries the virus for life even if genital warts are removed. The development of a vaccine against HPV is under way, but is still not available.

If left untreated, some genital warts may regress on their own. There are a number of effective treatments for removing genital warts. According the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, none of the following treatments is better than the others, and more than one treatment may be needed to effectively remove warts. These include:

  • Podofilox gel, which is a patient-applied treatment for external genital warts
  • Imiquimod cream, which is a patient-applied treatment for external genital warts and perianal warts
  • Chemical treatments (including trichloracetic acid and podophyllin), which must be applied by a trained health care provider to destroy warts
  • Cryotherapy, which uses liquid nitrogen to freeze off the warts
  • Laser therapy, which uses a laser beam or intense lights to destroy the warts
  • Electrosurgery, which uses and electric current to burn off the warts
  • Surgery, which can cut away the wart in one office visit
  • Interferon, an antiviral drug, which can be injected directly into warts

Each of these treatments has advantages and disadvantages, which you should discuss with your health care provider.



[ || Pregnancy || Informed Choice || Infections and Diseases || Quality of Care || Emerging Issues ]
[ Home | About AVSC | Site index | Publications ] [ Version Française | Versión Español ]
©2000 AVSC International. Please complete our survey or send questions/comments to: info@avsc.org.

Accueil | Conditions générales | FAQ | Contact | Créé par CAPIT
 Accueil
 Mon Menu Perso
 Rencontre
 Messagerie
 Chat
 Espace membre
 Expressions
 Forum
 Santé
 Mutuelles
 Contraception
 Bénins
 Grossesse
 IVG
 Stérilité
 MST
 Sida
 IAG
 Adresses
 Liens
 Sélection livres
 Forum santé
 Sexualité
 Mariage
 Astrologie
 Jeux
 Voyager
 Humour
 Editorial
5 connectés au chat
14 connectés au total
Consulter l'annonce
ajouter aux favoris Human Papillomavirus (genital warts)