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Men As Partners

MAP Publications

Male Involvement/Men's Programs
Case Studies
Workshops
Vasectomy/Vasectomy Counseling

Male Involvement/Men's Programs

  • Programming for Male Involvement in Reproductive Health: A Practical Guide for Managers.
    (AVSC 1997)
    AVSC PROGRAM GUIDE

    This guide offers helpful advice on how program managers can address critical issues when initiating or improving reproductive health services for men. The guide covers topics such as program design issues, community outreach and workplace programs, counseling, integration of sexually transmitted infection (STI) services, and the special needs of adolescents.
    Available for order from AVSC International. To order, please e-mail MAP@avsc.org. Available in English, Spanish, and French.

  • New Paradigms of Male Participation in Sexual and Reproductive Health: Symposium Report
    (AVSC 1998)
    AVSC REPORT

    This publication reports on the symposium held in Oaxaca, Mexico in October 1998. Over 100 participants from the Americas discussed topics such as the different forms of masculinity, sexuality, fatherhood, violence, and HIV/STI prevention and their impact on male involvement in sexual and reproductive health.
    For more information, please see the AVSC/IPPF Oaxaca Symposium synopsis. The full report is available for order from AVSC International. To order, please e-mail MAP@avsc.org. Available in English and Spanish.

  • New Paradigms of Male Participation in Sexual and Reproductive Health: Literature Review
    (AVSC 1998)
    AVSC REPORT

    A review of the programmatic and academic literature from the Americas region on the many issues that surround male participation in sexual and reproductive health. Major topics covered include masculinity, sexuality, fatherhood, violence, and HIV/STI prevention.
    Available for order from AVSC International. To order, please e-mail MAP@avsc.org. Available in English and Spanish.

  • The Concept of Men As Partners in Pakistan (by A. Levack and T. Rahim, POPULI, 1998-1999, 25(4):6-8.)
    JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Men in Pakistan often make the reproductive health decisions for the couple and, as such, efforts to work with men must constantly visit the issue of equality in decision-making to ensure that interventions are actually moving towards a more egalitarian relationship between men and women. This article examines the role of Pakistani men in family life, family planning decision-making and health-seeking behavior and argues that understanding of these issues is the first step towards improving the role of men in their own and their partners' reproductive health.

  • The Language of Male Involvement: What Do You Mean by That? (by Cynthia Steele Verme, Mary Nell Wegner, and Terrence Jezowski, POPULI, 1996, 23(2):10-12.)
    JOURNAL ARTICLE
    This article explores the linguistic pitfalls of three commonly used terms describing men's roles in reproductive health: ("men's responsibility," "men's involvement," and "men's programs") and proposes the use of the term "men as partners." The authors contend that because people hear the words used to describe men's participation in reproductive health so differently--based on their sex, world view, and experiences--discussions should begin with an exploration of these words and the meanings attributed to them.

  • Involving Men As Partners in Reproductive Health: Lessons Learned From Turkey (by John M. Pile, Cigdem Bumin, Arzum Ciloglu, and Ayse Akin, AVSC Working Paper No. 12, 1999.)
    AVSC REPORT
    As part of AVSC's Men As Partners initiative's efforts to document reproductive health programs for men, this paper describes the efforts of these programs in Turkey and the lessons Turkish service providers have learned about designing reproductive health services and activities that encourage the constructive involvement of men.
    This report can be viewed online or ordered for delivery. To order, please complete and send our printable form. Available in English. Single copies free; US$1.50 for each additional copy.

  • Men As Partners in Reproductive Health: From Issues to Action (by Mary Nell Wegner, Evelyn Landry, David Wilkinson, and Joanne Tzanis, International Family Planning Perspectives, 1998, 24(1):38-42.)
    JOURNAL ARTICLE
    In May 1997, 145 men and women from more than one dozen primarily African and Asian countries gathered in Mombasa, Kenya, to share their experiences with, knowledge of, and concerns about fostering men's involvement in reproductive health care. This article describes the dialogue and interchange which took place around issues such as defining terms, the role of gatekeepers, designing services, community involvement, communication with clients, sustainability, adolescent males, and the men's reproductive health model. By the end of the workshop, each country team left with a concrete action plan including strategies and activities to be carried out within the next year. Available in English, Spanish, and French.

  • Men's Reproductive Health: Defining, Designing and Delivering Services (by Isaiah Ndong, Robert M. Becker, Jeanne M. Haws, and Mary Nell Wegner, International Family Planning Perspectives, 1999, 25:S53-S55.)
    JOURNAL ARTICLE
    AVSC International convened a two-day meeting in April 1997 of 10 clinicians, counselors, and social scientists to devise a men's reproductive health model to serve as a framework for program development and service delivery. In order to take a first step toward making this model a reality, AVSC has contracted with several men's reproductive health clinicians to create a reproductive health curriculum to train service providers and to sensitize workers to the issues involved in serving male clients. This article discusses ongoing work with both the model and the curriculum, and addresses the issues and challenges related to defining, designing, and delivering male reproductive health services.

Case Studies

  • New Paradigms of Male Participation in Sexual and Reproductive Health: Five Case Studies (AVSC 1998)
    AVSC REPORT
    Five case studies of innovative programs in the Americas that are working to involve men constructively in sexual and reproductive health.
    For more information, please see the MAP case studies synopses. The full reports are available for order from AVSC International. To order, please e-mail MAP@avsc.org. Available in English and Spanish.

Workshops

  • Men As Partners in Reproductive Health: Workshop Report (AVSC 1997)
    AVSC REPORT

    This publication reports on the first inter-regional Men As Partners workshop, held in Mombasa, Kenya in May 1997. Over 140 participants from Africa and Asia discussed practical ways to provide services to men and to support their constructive involvement in the health of their female partners.
    For more information, please see the Mombasa inter-regional workshop synopsis. The full report is available for order from AVSC International. To order, please e-mail MAP@avsc.org. Available in English.

  • Men As Partners in Pakistan: Punjab Workshop Report (AVSC 1998)
    AVSC REPORT

    The report from the Men As Partners workshop held in Pakistan on March 16-19, 1998.
    For more information, please see the Pakistan in-country workshop synopsis. The full report is available for order from AVSC International. To order, please e-mail MAP@avsc.org. Available in English.

  • Men As Partners in Kenya: Nairobi Workshop Report (AVSC 1998)
    AVSC REPORT

    The report from the Men As Partners workshop held in Kenya on July 8-9, 1998.
    For more information, please see the Kenya in-country workshop synopsis. The full report is available for order from AVSC International. To order, please e-mail MAP@avsc.org. Available in English.

  • Men As Partners in Ghana: Cape Coast Workshop Report (AVSC 1998)
    AVSC REPORT

    The report from the Men As Partners workshop held in Ghana on August 4-6, 1998.
    For more information, please see the Ghana in-country workshop synopsis. The full report is available for order from AVSC International. To order, please e-mail MAP@avsc.org. Available in English.

Vasectomy/Vasectomy Counseling

  • The Introduction of No-Scalpel Vasectomy in the United States (1988-1992), (by Libby Antarsh and Shelly Marston-Ainley, AVSC Working Paper No. 3, 1993.)
    AVSC REPORT
    This paper describes how the combined efforts of a group of doctors, professional journals, the media, and the public encouraged the technique's acceptance. In 1988, AVSC decided for several reasons to support the introduction of no-scalpel vasectomy in the United States. First, the procedure seemed to be a substantial technical improvement over incisional vasectomy. Second, the no-scalpel approach could kindle interest in vasectomy for clients and for physicians, thus widening access to this contraceptive method. Third, the U.S. introduction could teach AVSC something about how to introduce the technique overseas.
    This report can be viewed online or ordered for delivery. To order, please complete and send our printable form. Available in English. Single copies free; US$1.50 for each additional copy.

  • Vasectomy in Kenya: The First Steps (by Pamela Lynam, Joseph Dwyer, David Wilkinson, and Evelyn Landry, AVSC Working Paper No. 4, 1993.)
    AVSC REPORT
    This paper describes the strategies AVSC International has taken to assess the potential niche for vasectomy in Kenya--conducting research into knowledge of and attitudes toward vasectomy among men in both urban and rural settings; examining the characteristics of Kenyan men who have had vasectomy; laying the groundwork for quality services, including training of surgeons; organizing a workshop to bring all these initiatives together; and carrying out a pilot study using the mass media to explore interest in vasectomy. The results of these efforts suggest that vasectomy does indeed have a role to play in Kenya and potentially elsewhere in Africa.
    This report can be viewed online or ordered for delivery. To order, please complete and send our printable form. Available in English and French. Single copies free; US$1.50 for each additional copy.

  • A Successful National Program for Expanding Vasectomy Services: The Experience of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (by Terrence W. Jezowski, Francisco Alarcón, Consuelo Juárez, Alcides Estrada, and Fernando Gómez, AVSC Working Paper No. 8, 1995.)
    AVSC REPORT
    This paper describes the innovative strategies adapted by the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Mexico's largest provider of health and family planning services, with the technical support of AVSC International, to improve the availability and use of vasectomy. These strategies included: introducing and adopting no-scalpel vasectomy as the program's standard technique; conducting training at the service sites for all personnel involved with vasectomy services using a novel "site training" approach; removing barriers by providing access to vasectomy at the primary-care level; and providing ongoing supervision and technical support to the local service delivery sites.
    This report can be viewed online or ordered for delivery. To order, please complete and send our printable form. Available in English and French. Single copies free; US$1.50 for each additional copy.

  • What's New with Male Sterilization: An Update (by Amy E. Pollack, Charles Carignan, and Sangeeta Pati, Contemporary OB/GYN, 1998, 43(7):41-42, 44, 53-56, 62, 64, 67.)
    JOURNAL ARTICLE
    It is estimated that more than 42 million couples worldwide rely on vasectomy--a safe, effective, and permanent contraceptive method. Vasectomy is safer, less expensive and equally as effective as tubal sterilization, and no negative long-term health effects have been consistently reported in the literature. This article discusses no-scalpel vasectomy (NSV), counseling specifics for male sterilization, and the nonsurgical permanent male methods that may some day make surgical sterilization unnecessary.

  • Vasectomy and Prostate Cancer: The Evidence to Date (by Herbert Peterson and Stuart S. Howards, Fertility and Sterility, 1998, 70(2):201-203.)
    JOURNAL ARTICLE
    This article discusses how studies of the vasectomy-prostate cancer relationship are inconsistent, and points out that the observed associations among most positive studies are weak in epidemiologic terms. The authors argue that there is little biologic plausibility for an effect of vasectomy on the risk of prostate cancer. They conclude that the argument for a causal relationship between vasectomy and prostate cancer remains weak.

  • Clinical Aspects of Vasectomies Performed in the United States in 1995 (by Jeanne M. Haws, Gwendolyn T. Morgan, Amy E. Pollack, Lisa M. Koonin, Robert J. Magnani, and Paul M. Gargiullo, Urology, 1998, 52(4): 685-691.)
    JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Currently, no surveillance system collects data on the numbers and characteristics of vasectomies performed annually in the United States. This study provides nationwide data on the numbers of vasectomies and the use of no-scalpel vasectomy, various occlusion methods, fascial interposition, and protocols for analyzing semen after vasectomy.

  • Increasing the Availability of Vasectomy in Public-Sector Clinics (by Jeanne M. Haws, Maureen McKenzie, Manisha Mehta, and Amy E. Pollack, International Family Planning Perspectives, 1997, 29(4):185-186, 190.)
    JOURNAL ARTICLE
    This article describes a program in which physicians at 43 facilities in the U.S. were trained in no-scalpel vasectomy between 1993 and 1995. The authors identify three elements required for the successful establishment or expansion of vasectomy services--sufficient numbers of trained providers, funds to subsidize vasectomies for men who cannot afford them, and activities to raise awareness about the availability of low-cost or free vasectomy.

  • Perspectives from Couples on the Vasectomy Decision: A Six-Country Study (by Evelyn Landry and Victoria Ward, in Beyond Acceptability: Users' Perspectives on Contraception, a special issue of Reproductive Health Matters, 1997, T.K. Sundari Ravindran, M. Berer, and J. Cottingham (eds.), 58-66.)
    JOURNAL ARTICLE
    This paper contains data from a qualitative study that includes 218 in-depth interviews with couples from Bangladesh, Kenya, Mexico, Rwanda, Sri Lanka, and the U.S. who decided to have a vasectomy. It examines key factors that led the men to choose vasectomy and the role their partners played in this decision. It also examines issues raised about multiple partners and the need for protection against sexually transmitted infection.

  • Improving Vasectomy Services in Kenya: Lessons from a Mystery Client Study (by David Wilkinson, Mary Nell Wegner, Ngunjiri Mwangi, and Pamela Lynam, Reproductive Health Matters, 1996, Vol. 7:115-121.)
    JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Researchers in Kenya designed a "mystery client" study in which men posed as potential vasectomy clients at clinics in different parts of the country and found wide variations in how men were treated.

  • Using the Newspaper to Disseminate Vasectomy Information in Kenya (by David John Wilkinson, Pamela Fenney, Katherine Mason, and Grace E. Wambwa, International Quarterly of Community Health Education, 1993-1994, 14(2):165-172.)
    JOURNAL ARTICLE
    Little effort has been put into addressing the barriers to vasectomy acceptance in Kenya, partly because of the commonly held assumption that Kenyan men would not be interested in the method. Innovative Communication Systems, with the support of AVSC, implemented a study using print media to examine this perception. Advertisements providing information about the method were placed in newspapers and a magazine, and an unexpectedly large response was received.

  • Vasectomy Counseling (by Jeanne M. Haws and Joel Feigin, American Family Physician, 1995, 52(5):1395-1399.)
    JOURNAL ARTICLE
    This article presents 10 recommendations for those who counsel patients about vasectomy that may help to minimize the risk of litigation for family physicians who provide vasectomy services.

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